IC-bG Course-builder Workshop at SERMACS this Friday

Kim Cossey and Julia Metzker will be hosting several IC-bG themed sessions for chemists at the Southeastern Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (SERMACS) in Raleigh, NC this week:
Too Much Information: Reducing Content and Increasing Impact in Your Chemistry Course (Prezi)
Kimberly Cossey, Julia K Padden Metzker
Does planning your course make you feel like you are in a race to complete a list of content? Rather than feeling compelled to teach everything in the ever-expanding textbook, we, as chemical educators, need to empower our students with the skills needed to evaluate multiple sources of information and arrive at a logical conclusion. Using textbooks as a resource, rather than the only source of information, can empower faculty and reinvigorate courses. Using examples from general, organic and inorganic chemistry courses, we will demonstrate how active learning strategies designed to enhance students’ critical thinking skills can replace some content-based lectures and lead to improved student learning outcomes.

Reducing lecture and increasing impact in an organic I course: Redesign and implementation
Kimberly Cossey
Imagine an organic chemistry classroom where instead of listening to a lecture, students are leading a discussion based off their readings. Imagine students studying, but instead of making flashcards and lists, they are engaging in complex problems and devising strategies to complete them. This vision was used to design my current organic I course. Using backward course design, an organic I course has been restructured so that rather than lecturing over every concept, the professor helps students to prioritize concepts, provides problem solving strategies, and fills-in key details as needed. Active learning strategies (adapted from POGIL and PBL methods) have been used to engage students in critical thinking and application tasks. Assessment will focus on traditional outcomes (e.g. solving synthetic and mechanistic problems), as well as secondary outcomes, such as critical reading. This talk will focus on the redesign and planning process (including assessment plan), and implementation of the course.

Backward course design: Starting with the end in mind (pdf)
Kimberly Cossey, Julia K Padden Metzker
Imagine an organic chemistry classroom where instead of listening to a lecture, students are leading a discussion based off their readings. Imagine students studying, but instead of making flashcards and lists, they are engaging in complex problems and devising strategies to complete them. This vision was used to design my current organic I course. Using backward course design, an organic I course has been restructured so that rather than lecturing over every concept, the professor helps students to prioritize concepts, provides problem solving strategies, and fills-in key details as needed. Active learning strategies (adapted from POGIL and PBL methods) have been used to engage students in critical thinking and application tasks. Assessment will focus on traditional outcomes (e.g. solving synthetic and mechanistic problems), as well as secondary outcomes, such as critical reading. This talk will focus on the redesign and planning process (including assessment plan), and implementation of the course.

Advertisements

About Dr. J. Metzker

I believe in the power of a liberal education to transform individuals and society. I am currently the Executive Director of the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence. Formerly, I led a community engagement initiative and held a full professorship in chemistry at a public liberal arts university. I am a proud product of The Evergreen State College.
This entry was posted in announcement. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s