Reading List – Advancing Engaged Scholarship in Promotion and Tenure: A Roadmap and Call for Reform

O’Meara, K., Eatman, T. & Peterson, S. (2015). Advancing Engaged Scholarship in Promotion and Tenure: A Roadmap and Call for Reform. Liberal Education, Vol. 101, No. 3.

Despite the precipitous increase in nontenure-track faculty appointments, the promotion and tenure process continues to operate as a central “motivational and cultural force in the academic lives” of many faculty members.1 As a part of larger reward systems, the promotion and tenure process reflects institutional values, aspirations, privileges, and power structures. Virtually every campus enacting serious change with regard to curricula, technology, globalization, learning, or retention must also face the implications for promotion and tenure. Yet while faculty members want to (and should) be recognized and rewarded for their efforts, many express frustration that promotion and tenure systems have not caught up with institutional priorities, changes in the dynamic nature of scholarship, or the aspirations of the emerging guard of academic citizens.2 It often escapes those who complain, however, that the power to change promotion and tenure policy rests to a great degree with the faculty.

Read the entire article in Liberal Education

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About Dr. J. Metzker

I believe in the power of a liberal education to transform individuals and society. I am currently the Executive Director of the Brown Center for Faculty Innovation and Excellence. Formerly, I led a community engagement initiative and held a full professorship in chemistry at a public liberal arts university. I am a proud product of The Evergreen State College.
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One Response to Reading List – Advancing Engaged Scholarship in Promotion and Tenure: A Roadmap and Call for Reform

  1. Reblogged this on Liberal Arts Renewal Project (LARP) and commented:

    As we know, a major implication of bringing high-impact practices to our classes is if that effort will be rewarded in the tenure and promotion system. This article presents a pathway for aligning the reward structure with institutional values.

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